Your True Home

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Mary OFarrell found another wonderful tidbit from John O’Donohue…

YOUR TRUE HOME

Each one of us is alone in the world. It takes great courage to meet the full force of your aloneness. Most of the activity in society is subconsciously designed to quell the voice crying in the wilderness within you. The mystic Thomas A. Kempis said that when you go out into the world, you return having lost some of yourself. Until you learn to inhabit your aloneness, the lonely distraction and noise of society will seduce you into false belonging, with which you will only become empty and weary. When you face your aloneness, something begins to happen. Gradually, the sense of bleakness changes into a sense of true belonging. This is a slow and open-ended transition but it is utterly vital in order to come into rhythm with your own individuality. In a sense this is the endless task of finding your true home within your life. It is not narcissistic, for as soon as you rest in the house of your own heart, doors and windows begin to open outwards to the world. No longer on the run from your aloneness, your connections with others become real and creative. You no longer need to covertly scrape affirmation from others or from projects outside yourself. This is slow work; it takes years to bring your mind home.

JOHN O’DONOHUE

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6 thoughts on “Your True Home”

  1. I am finding myself again after the loss of my husband. I’m remembering the things i enjoyed that I put aside because other things needed my attention. But now I’m rediscovering again the things I enjoyed in the past and find that being alone is no longer as scary as I once thought it to be. It is peaceful and as an artist it is fruitful. Dwell in peace.

  2. I love my aloneness. It is scary only when I get so used to it that I avoid company. I enjoy company of family and good friends but I find meeting people just for the sake of interaction a waste of time.

  3. I’ve found myself sad and lonely more often of late. No good reason. I’m trying to decide not to. To awake each morning and decide to have a good day. Sometimes it works. Often it doesn’t.
    Praying you can.

  4. In the past I would ring anyone who would listen now I can be alone and enjoy it. Not sure if age is the reason I can manage it or the hobbies I do.

    1. I did that when first bereaved, but over the years have come to accept.
      Putting the key in the lock and entering my home gives me great pleasure, alone but not lonely.

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